Monday, August 26, 2013

Bottle School in the Phillipines - How To Build


http://www.inspirationgreen.com/plastic-bottle-schools.html

Bottle Schools



plastic bottle school

Pepsi partnered with the My Shelter foundation to build this school house made of 9,000 plastic bottles in San Pablo, Philippines. Thousands of volunteers recruited by Pepsi -- collected the used bottles, helped to raise awareness of the Philippines classroom shortage and participated in building the structure. Pepsi's clean-up campaign website, sarapmagbago.com and lots more photos here: facebook.com/pepsisarapmagbago
Photo © Kristel Marie Fuentes Gonzales.




plastic bottle school

After the 9,000 bottles were collected each 1.5 and 2-litre bottle was filled with adobe (sand, clay, and water with a bit of straw, twigs or manure thrown in). This machine made the filling much easier. Pic: 1.bp.blogspot.com Video: www.youtube.com




plastic bottle school

The filled bottles set out to dry...




plastic bottle school

The building process begins. Pic: www.micealiling.com




plastic bottle school

String is used to keep the bottles in place as the adobe is being applied.
Pic: www.micealiling.com




plastic bottle school

Ran out of caps...




plastic bottle school

A bit more cement will be applied and smoothed out.
Photo © Kristel Marie Fuentes Gonzales




plastic bottle school

Photo © Kristel Marie Fuentes Gonzales




plastic bottle school

Almost there. The roof is made of compressed tetra packs.
Photo © Kristel Marie Fuentes Gonzales



bottle school

One wall is made of glass bottles.
Photo © Kristel Marie Fuentes Gonzales


plastic bottle school

The inside walls were whitewashed.
Pic: campaignbrief.com www.bottleschoolproject.org



plastic bottle construction

Photo © Kristel Marie Fuentes Gonzales
www.bottleschoolproject.org




On the other side of the planet:



plastic bottle school

In Guatemala, volunteers with the help of the community, build plastic bottle school houses using a construction method pioneered by non-profit Pura Vida. The first plastic bottle school in Guatemala was started by volunteers in the Peace Corps and when they ran out of resources they called on Hug It Forward, an NGO that has now helped build numerous plastic bottle schools accross Guatemala. www.hugitforward.com



plastic bottle school

First, the students and volunteers stuff the plastic bottles with insulating trash. Each student is asked to collect and fill at least 20 bottles. They stuff each bottle with plastic waste, such as styrofoam, snack wrappers and plastic bags - the more compacted, the sturdier the building blocks and the less garbage remaining on the streets. www.flickr.com




plastic bottle construction

Hugitforward builds bottle schools a different way.
www.hugitforward.com




plastic bottle construction

The stuffed bottles are tied with string to keep them in place. Pictured is the 5th Hug it Forward school, under construction in La Cereza, finished July 2010. www.hugitforward.com




plastic bottle construction

Bottles strung to chicken wire on one side. Now the chicken wire will be placed on this side as well. www.flickr.com




plastic bottle school

Students stuff waste plastic in between the bottles. www.flickr.com




plastic bottle construction

The older students are called in for the higher work. www.flickr.com




plastic bottle construction

Applying cement to the inside of the building...
Students help sift the sand, mix and then apply cement that was donated. www.flickr.com



plastic bottle construction

And on the outside... Three layers of cement are applied. www.flickr.com




plastic bottle construction

Neater job = better trowel...
This is the 5th Hug it Forward school, under construction in La Cereza, finished July 2010. www.hugitforward.com




plastic bottle building

This school used metal frames instead of cement posts.
www.hugitforward.com




plastic bottle building

This one with a thatched roof. www.flickr.com




plastic bottle building

The final look - you would never know the main ingredient if they did not leave cutouts... www.flickr.com




plastic bottle construction

A cutout. Just a reminder...
www.hugitforward.com



plastic bottle construction

Outside -- under construction. A bench surrounding a tree. www.flickr.com




Bottle Construction ‘How-to’ By Laura Kutner, Peace Corps/Guatemala
Source: www.peacecorps.gov

1. Make sure your community is involved and that you have a safe/approved location to build.
2. Make sure you have a budget and enough funding.
3. Collect and stuff bottles and gather lots of inorganic trash. Each bottle and all of the stuffing material has to be clean (rinsed in water) and dried. If anything is wet or dirty it will become moldy and start to smell. Organic trash, such as paper, cardboard, dirt, and rocks, cannot be used.
4. Set up a frame, foundation, and roof comprised of either wood, metal or cement columns.
5. Start putting chicken wire on the outside of the frame, then work on the inside in sections, putting in the bottles while you slowly connect the inside layer of chicken wire to the outside, securing the bottles tightly.
6. Continue section by section, until bottles are placed, then stuff all empty leftover spaces with inorganic trash.
7. Test the cement mixture (no limestone) to make sure it sticks. Then start placing the first layer of cement.
8. When this dries, start a second layer.
9. Finish with a third layer then lay the flooring.
10. Inaugurate and celebrate!


Hug it Forward's
"The Bottle School Manual" a step-by-step guide to building a bottle school, complete with pictures and diagrams of each stage of the construction process. www.bottleschools.com


Another organization working with plastic bottles in Latin America: www.longwayhomeinc.org
A plastic bottle latrine with composting toilet: catorcekt.wordpress.com


See IG's Plastic Bottle Homes page as well... inspirationgreen.org/plastic-bottle-homes


Hug It Forward - 3 Months of filming compressed into a 3 minute video. This is a good overview of the hard work, dedication, win-wins, and excitement surrounding Bottle Schools.

Share this page... http://www.inspirationgreen.com/plastic-bottle-schools.ht

See comments and more ideas on InspirationGreen.com


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1 comment:

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